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Arts and Entertainment Scene: Artist’s Show at Omaha Gallery Explores Intercultural ‘Commentation’

Arts and Entertainment Scene: Artist’s Show at Omaha Gallery Explores Intercultural ‘Commentation’

All the action in and around Omaha in November.


A new art exhibit at the Roberta and Bob Rogers Gallery explores the experiences of a first-generation American artist.

“Primero,” featuring tracks by Brian Raimundo, begins with a reception from 5-7 p.m. Friday and runs through January 7, 2023.







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Raymundo is a budding printmaker studying for a Master of Fine Arts degree in the print industry at Kansas State University. He is on his way to graduate in May next year. He earned his undergraduate degree in printing from Wichita State University.

For display, he says, he used layers, folding, cutting, and slicing to showcase his experiments with materials and processes.

“Primero showcases works that allowed me to explore intercultural tension and suspension in my upbringing,” he said in an art statement. “The images in these prints are inspired by my experience of commenting between Mexican and American culture.”

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Raymundo fine art prints are woodcuts, bas-reliefs, and dry dots (a technique in which an image is slashed into a plate with a hard, pointed needle of sharp metal or diamonds).







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Artist Brian Raimondo’s piece “Mark for Death” on display at the Roberta and Bob Rogers Gallery, 1806 Fenton St.


Roberta and Bob Rogers Gallery


Some confuse printing methods and techniques, and use a variety of print papers, both transparent and opaque, to explore the change in the images they created.

Gallery opens, at 1806 Vinton St. , 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday.

For more information, visit rbrg.org.

Great Plains Theater Conference Presents “Goose”

Who wouldn’t want to change a life that wasn’t what we had in mind?

The main character, Dallin, gets that makeover in the play “Goose” by Seattle-based writer Michael Yichao which is being produced by Great Plains Theater Commons next week.

As Dallin got older, nothing happened as he had expected. In the first chapter, no one showed up at his thirteenth birthday party. In the second trimester, he’s back home after spending a lot of time with a 13-year-old daughter. Then it seems that an old friend takes him on a journey through time and space.

Free tickets are available to play on eventbrite.com. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. on November 18 and 19; And 6 pm. November 20. It will be served at Yates Illuminate, 3260 Davenport St.

The cast includes Artie Shaw, Daryl Brown, Jr., and Annie Skinnes. Tami Ra’ is the director.

Yishao’s plays have received recognition from the National Conference of Playwrights at the O’Neill Theater and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, among other organizations. It was produced throughout the United States and Canada.

Omaha Symphony, high school choirs to perform “Carmina Burana”

Omaha Symphony, three professional soloists and about 350 students from eight high school choirs will perform Carl Orff’s masterpiece “Carmina Burana” on Sunday at Holland Center.

Choral Work, a poetic and dramatic collection of texts set on music, is this year’s program for the annual collaborative choral between symphony and vocal programs for area students. Participating high schools are Bellevue East, Bellevue West, Bennington, Burke, Creighton Prep, Elkhorn, and Fremont, as well as the Omaha Public Schools Small Singers Choir.

Distinguished soloists are soprano Jessica Bibi, tenor Eric Barry and baritone Markel Reed. Ernest Richardson, resident orchestra and pop lead, will be on the podium.

The Choral Collaborative gives Symphony a chance to produce an impressive mass production while introducing young people to world-class choral music. The students were all preparing for the event with Richardson, choir directors, voice teachers, and speech coaches.

Carmina Burana is based on a series of 209 secular poems written in the 13th century and was one of the 20th century’s most widely performed and celebrated compositions. In addition to concert performances, it has been shown on television and in films.

The program begins at 2 p.m. at the Kiewit Concert Hall in the center near 12th and Douglas Streets. Tickets, starting at $20, are available at omahasymphony.org or by calling Ticket Omaha at 402-345-0606.

“Sabaya Cinema” precedes the debate on Israeli and Arab women

The screening of an award-winning film on friendship and understanding between Arab and Jewish women will be followed by a lively discussion on the topic.

Cinema Sabaya: Hearing the Voices of Arab and Jewish Women takes place Tuesday at Benson Theatre, 6054 Maple Street.

The Israeli movie “Cinema Sabaya” begins at 6:30 pm. The discussion will begin immediately and will be moderated by Women Leading Dialogue, a group of Arab and Israeli women who have traveled from Israel to share experiences and promote coexistence. .

The University of Nebraska’s Omaha Schwalbe Center for Israeli and Jewish Studies is sponsoring the event with the Jewish Federation of Omaha and Benson Theater. It’s free, but reservations are required. Go to bensontheatre.org to register.

elizabeth.freeman@owh.com, 402-444-1267


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