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Colombia: Naval Cadet School’s flight simulator strives to reduce accidents – Diálogo Américas

Colombia: Naval Cadet School’s flight simulator strives to reduce accidents – Diálogo Américas

Spatial confusion is among the problems that have plagued the aviation industry for decades, which can cause pilots to lose control and crash. Since the dawn of aviation, this phenomenon has caused thousands of deaths.

“Pilots who fly over the sea experience this sensation due to marine weather conditions. The sea and sky overlap on the horizon and it becomes difficult to tell where one stops and the other begins,” said Colombian Navy Captain Alberto Fierro Monge, Director of the Naval Aviation School of the Colombian Navy (ESCAN). . Dialog. “Once you lose the signals on the ground, you lose that direction, so what you need to do in that moment is go ahead and believe in the flying instruments.”

As such, seeking to train pilots to perceive spatial confusion, spatial confusion-inducing scenarios, and retrieval techniques, graduates of the Almirante Padilla Naval Cadet School (ENAP) came up with the idea to create a flight simulator prototype, also known as a Flight Training Device (FTD).

“Initially we chose the Barany chair, which is a chair that moves; Colombian Navy Lieutenant Mateo Bosso Marin, who with Lieutenant Colonel Willian Roncalo built the FTD model, said. Dialog. “But it’s only performing one type of movement, so we chose to design or build a simulator that has pitch and roll capability, has the ability to connect to an existing flight simulator and can also work with virtual reality goggles, and that’s we added antenna-powered platform movements that will recreate the same movements of the aircraft.

The prototype combines simulation software and tools such as sensors, virtual reality goggles and a joystick, which are connected via an electronic system to the chair designed by the graduates, where pitch and roll movements can be performed at different angles, and tilt management up to 30 degrees. (Photo: Colombian Navy)

The prototype combines simulation software and tools such as sensors, virtual reality goggles and a joystick, which are linked via an electronic system to the graduate-designed chair, where pitch and roll movements can be performed at different angles, and tilt management up to 30 degrees, the Navy said in a press release. The prototype will be delivered to ESCAN to support pilot training programs and, due to its compact design, will be easily transported to various areas that the Naval Enterprise may need.

“The new or special feature developed by this project and developed by the Naval Cadet School officers, is the use of virtual reality glasses,” said Capt. Fierro. “Our Naval Flight School currently has some hardware, with some flight simulators in widespread use around the world, but what stands out most about this initiative for these officers is the virtual reality goggles, which greatly improve some of the simulation properties, meaning that wherever you look , left, right, it will look more realistic. It’s closer to what one would normally notice in flight, so that’s the great advantage of this device.”

Once the FTD is transferred to ESCAN, Capt. Fierro said, it will be used to practice flight procedures under the Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). “Of course, it can contribute to the training of the entire Colombian armed forces, and why not, the military forces of allied countries; this will be done according to their needs, depending on whether they have similar equipment for training or not,” added Captain Fierro. Through USCAP [the U.S.-Colombia Action Plan for Regional Security] The ESCAN programme, we already offer training to member countries in the various programs we have available, utilizing the capabilities of our Center for Training and Simulation of Air Emergencies – CESEA. “


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