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High school science students evaluate local fish populations

High school science students evaluate local fish populations

High school science students evaluate local fish populations

Bristol Agee teaches environmental sciences to younger generations.



♪ China: Calm water believes in what lies beyond. Brian talks about River Hering, a migratory fish that is abundant on 220 acres near the Bristol County Agricultural High School campus. Its marine biology classes. >> Learn to go out in the world and see these fish in streams and rivers all over Massachusetts yards. Pull it in. put it in. >> Today, they are evaluating the locals. >> Another nine-member Fisher, right? Here you are. Throw it in the water. >> This program is extremely important. CHINA: Alison Studies is the director of science and strategy at the Boston Branch of The Nature Conservancy, a nonprofit focused on climate change and biodiversity loss. >> Weed is healthy. This means that the pure water in which they live is healthy. Shayna: During the spring, I was born in fresh water. >> About full time, they move from the bottom to the estuaries and cycle for four years feeding the ocean and growing before returning to the clear waters. CHINA: They say billions of Herings live from Newfoundland to Florida, but pollution, overfishing and other factors have reduced their population. >> Today, maybe 1%. However, Chyna: , running lawn in the watershed is successful, because there are no dams. Nearly a million fish-herders each year – a region. >> All freshwater habitats are gone. This is the front line of climate change. Since the sea level rises to clearer waters is warmed more, but since there are no dams on the ecosystem it can be changed, so it has room to do what needs to be done. >> Many of our native species are in danger and there are things we can do to protect them. >> Hopes to go into fisheries biology. >>>> It’s great to see what you don’t see. When you look at a body of water coming in, you don’t know what kind of ecological environment it is, so when you take this sample and see what’s going on under the water, it’s a whole new world. Anthony: We’ve heard a lot that homeowners who live along the coast can help. Chyna: They can keep the shoreline clean by growing native plants that grow on their own. This is a busy night. Thank you for joining us. Anton

High school science students evaluate local fish populations

Bristol Agee teaches environmental sciences to younger generations.

We travel around coastal Massachusetts to learn about a few local “pointer types,” which can help explain the impact of climate change. Award-winning documentary actress Kim Smith shares the story of the breeding of pipe plovers in Massachusetts. Scientists at Nature and students at Bristol Aggie examine the health of river herring in the Taunton River watershed, the city of Cambridge raises monarch butterflies to release them, and each year hundreds of head sea turtles are stranded. The New England Aquarium’s Sea Turtle Hospital rescues aquariums while terrapin head turtles struggle to survive, in Plymouth in Manumet, researchers monitor coastal health, house songbirds, and study the presence of a great migratory shorebird – the woof.

We travel around coastal Massachusetts to learn about a few local “pointer types,” which can help explain the impact of climate change. Award-winning documentary actress Kim Smith shares the story of the breeding of pipe plovers in Massachusetts.

Scientists at Nature and students at Bristol Aggie examine the health of river herring in the Taunton River watershed.

The city of Cambridge raises monarch butterflies to release them.

Every year, hundreds of head sea turtles are stranded. The Sea Turtle Hospital New England Aquarium comes to the rescue.

Meanwhile, terrapin head turtles are struggling to survive.

In Plymouth in Manumet, researchers monitor coastal health, the tag of songbirds, and study the presence of a great migratory shore bird – the wimbrill.


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