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Jeremy Pike: Children’s Gloves for RCMP Blatant Hypocrisy | Salt Wire

Jeremy Pike: Children’s Gloves for RCMP Blatant Hypocrisy | Salt Wire

Jeremy Pike • Guest review

The Nova Scotia Mass Injury Commission has serious public trust issues on its hands.

The commission’s “shock-conscious” actions appear to be a way of allowing key RCMP decision makers to avoid aggressive questioning by the lawyers for victims’ families who were forced to summon an investigation in the first place.

It should be remembered that this investigation was not conducted because the RCMP or the current government wanted a thorough and comprehensive fact-finding body to determine exactly what led to the April 2020 mass shooting. They did so as a result of public pressure. This alone is shameful beyond words.

We now see that this fact-finding effort is not willing to go in depth or allow victims’ lawyers to actively participate. I cannot understand how all the brilliant legal minds on this committee do not see how much damage this decision has done to their credibility.

Governments in Nova Scotia have a history of willful blindness when it comes to the behavior of the RCMP, which has severe and devastating consequences.

Case in point: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Halifax Regional Police have admitted destroying evidence that would have released Glenn Asson years earlier. He was unjustly convicted of killing his ex-girlfriend in 1995.

HRP and RCMP supervisors should have known, however it took nearly 16 years from the time the evidence was destroyed for there to be any kind of investigation into the behavior of members of the RCMP whose actions helped keep an innocent man in prison for over a decade. It should have been.

No one wanted to look at that, in my view, because it had a very real possibility of looking at the RCMP and the criminal justice system in serious disrepute and causing embarrassment for all the players involved.

We are facing a very similar situation at the moment, with the Mass Casualty Commission whose findings likely paint a less than satisfactory picture of the behavior of the RCMP.

The commission says that by reducing witness questioning, they hoped to minimize harm to RCMP witnesses by not subjecting them to trauma back on the stage.

If only the legal system had been empathetic and understanding when it came to domestic abuse victims.

Ceres Winter was a domestic violence victim who was arrested, forcibly confined, and eventually charged with not appearing to testify against her abuser because she feared for her life.

MCC legal minds see it as a reasonable accommodation not to traumatize RCMP officers again, but if you are a black and Aboriginal victim of domestic violence, the same general group of actors (lawyers, judges, law enforcement) will charge and lock you up Instead of giving you this housing.

MCC legal minds see it as a reasonable accommodation not to traumatize RCMP officers again, but if you are a black and Aboriginal victim of domestic violence, the same general group of actors (lawyers, judges, law enforcement) will charge and lock you up Instead of giving you this housing.

Whether the commission actually behaves in a way that protects the RCMP from scrutiny and embarrassment is almost irrelevant, because the perception is that they clearly are – and that there is one standard for traumatized police officers and another for the general public.

The hypocrisy here is remarkable.

I think the Commission suspects, just as all Nova Scotia residents do at this point, that the RCMP likely made several well-intentioned but ultimately tragic decisions during the course of this tragedy. But preventing families from getting to know the truth means deliberately ignoring the trauma they have gone through.

For all those who need a refresher on what the legal community calls “willful blindness,” I will leave you with the words of British lawyer and judge Lord Sumner (1859-1934): He knows nothing because he does not want to know. Learning something can be unpleasant, and knowing it, when gained, may be uninteresting or unpleasant. Refusing to know more about the subject or anything at all is then willful but true ignorance. On the other hand, it is said that a man does not know because he does not want to know, where he carries the essence of a thing in his mind with the conviction that complete details or subtle evidence may be dangerous, as it may embarrass him. Deny or compromise his protests. In such a case he boasts of himself that where ignorance is safe, it is foolish to be wise, but there is mistaken, for he has been foretold, and his further ignorance, though real and complete, is only emotion and disguise. . “

Jeremy Pike lives in Human Resource Management



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